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command will likely look like when the u.s. transitions to what will be essentially a nato, plus arab countries. h isep model used in afghanistan as it's described to me. we understand the u.s. and france have come to a late agree in the the last few hours there is now no discrepancy between what france wants and what the u.s. wants. the president we understand is culting short his visit to latin america. he plans to transition. i'm told we can expect a transition of command by this time next week. the headquarters likely to be at a nato headquarters in naples, italy. the f-15 fighter jet went down at 11:33 monday evening local time according to u.s. marine officials. the two airmen ejected safely after an apparent malfunction of the jet. other pilots in the air at the time say they did not see enemy fire. seven u.s. military aircraft were launched from their bases in the mediterranean to take part in the recovery. two u.s. carrier jets flew cover for the mission and defense officials confirmed dropped two bomb to separate the pilot from suspected enemy approach. the downed pilot was
to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps harrier jet have flown more than 212 missions so far against the libyan forces. ships in the mediterranean has launched more than 160 tomahawk cruise missiles. in the daylight the damage is becoming clear. this is what is left of several large rocket launchers, trucks and also other military hardware in tripoli's port area. far to the east, a u.s. fighter plane crashed due to mechanical problems. that happened near the opposition strong hold of bengahzi. the two-man crew parachuted from the doomed aircraft. u.s. marines managed to extract crewmen, one was picked up by rebels and taken to a luxury hotel suite. he's back in american hands. two days after the coalition missile slammed into his tripoli compound, a defined moammar gadhafi has been addressing supporters. he urged muslims worldwide to join the battle against what he calls blatant aggression. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. they will not penalize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. we will d
safe for infants, i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the "situation room." in a span of 24 hours, the u.s. military said the coalition launched more than 50 strikes in the mission to protect libyan civilians. but no indication the battle is being over. just a short while ago the secretary of state warned gadhafi the quickest way to end it is for him to leave.<[kyk: . we2íor certainly encouraged the would make a right decision. not only institute a real co comprehensive cease-fire but withdraw from the cities and military abs and prepare for a transition that does not incl e include. >> there are serious reports of major clashes under way. what do we know about the fighting at this moment. >> you just heard secretary of state hillary clinton encouraging momammar gadhafi bu he's not backing down. a couple of major developments that shows that this conflict is far from over. anded stage is set from what could be a lengthy and complicated conflict. let's start with a strategically strategic city. then gadhafi forces took it over. when the momentum shifted back to the opposition forces and t
@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, the u.s. loses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> ( translated ): we will win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat: nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrender. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a numbe
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
, by any method. >> now, in a u.s. military briefing just a couple of hours ago, we were told there was no indication gadhafi's forces are moving away from either misrata or ajdabiya. cnn's nic robertson is in the capital city of tripoli. nic, tell me what you have been seeing there if the last 24 hours and also how gadhafi's defiance, if at all, has changed some of the forces within the capital city. >> reporter: well, one of the things we've seen really that reflects the fact that this no-fly zone seems to be fully in place is overnight last night, just before dawn this morning, we heard what sounded like jet aircraft flying overhead and then several loud explosions. so it does give the impression that the coalition can fly and can target locations in and around the city. effectively, it would seem like almost with impunity right now. ajdabiya is a red line for gadhafi. as government officials, they want to hold on to the city. it does appear they're not moving their forces out. the same with misrata. the impression is although a couple of coalition strikes overnight diminis
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
in the price of crude equals to a $40 billion withdrawal of funds from the u.s. economy. that's just america's stats of the take that around the world and see how bad it is to have crude go higher. this is a serious problem. we need to stop crude from going higher and certainly pulling the speculators from the market is a way to slow down the price movement because if you do not have reason to take delivery, you would not just be buying for a pure speculator to make money. >>neil: but you physically have to have the oil. interesting. thank you very much. >>guest: thank you for having me. >>neil: coalition forces flying 175 anythings over libya but they will not get him from the united arab emirates refusing to join blaming the decision on "u.s. policies toward bahrain," which is facing its own revolt. and our guest says if they will not get involved, why are we? the former head of the c.i.a. osama bin laden unit, and i don't buy their reason. how bahrain is an excuse, that strikes me as them getting cold feet on looking like they are participating in an arab crackdown. >>guest: i think it is
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
we think this is going to be? can they make up for these losses? >> u.s. investors are rattled. coach shares are down 8%, but if you look at the long-term outlook, it looks a little better for these retailers. it's going to take a few months, but japanese contention there will eventually rebound, and what they're doing right now is pushing hard into china trying to grow their businesses. also here in the u.s., we see the demand for luxury goods improving that's rebounding with the economic recovery here in the u.s. suzanne? >> all right, allison, thank you. appreciate it. >>> we want to go beyond the headlines now on the recovery of those two airmen after their fighter jet crashed in libya. we're learning more about how the chain of events played out. u.n. forces rescued the pilot and libyans found the weapons officer. >> i am speaking with him and i kiss him and i tell him you are coming for us. you are our brothers. so don't be afraid. you will be safe. we will carry you anyplace you want. >> for more details on the crash and the recovery, i want to bring in our pentagon corresponde
. the u.s. is making it increasingly clear that having been in the lead of the libyan mission, it wants to step back now. the latest reports from the rebel-held town talk of pro gaddafi snipers filing at the hospital. -- firing at the hospital. >> please, please bomb his forces until they stop. i have to be impartial because i am a medical person, but five, six consecutive days that have been killing with tanks and artillery, bombing us. please stop him. >> other residents say they have attacked their base. the rebels remain for now force of on certain potential, but it is clear the situation is increasingly turning into a test of the coalition possibility to influence events on the ground. -- the coalition's ability to influence events on the ground. >> with me now it is ben brown. there has been much activity around you today? >> the rebels are still trying to push west, about an hour-and- a-half from here, trying to take advantage of the coalition air strikes and military action which they are seeing day after day, night after night. the rebels are making heavy delegate of getting an
flown by u.s. pilots. >> greta: steve, thank you. >> former secretary of defense rumsfeld goes on the record. secretary nice to see you. >> thank you. >> greta: today on your twitter account says there is a reason qadhafi isn't contemplating using a nuclear weapon, he saw what happened to saddam. >> it is a little known story. the truth is qadhafi and the libyans, for years had been developing nuclear weapons. and at some moment, after the major combat operations and after saddam was captured. when he was pull out of the spider hole, apparently, qadhafi went to some westerners and said i did not want to be the next saddam hussein. and indicated that he did have a nuclear program. indicated that he was willing to give up his nuclear program. and in fact, invited inspectors in and people to help dismantle the activities that he untaken to develop a nuclear weapon. >> greta: was he talking to berlusconi? >> i've not verified that, but apparently. >> greta: that struck me. when you talk about qadhafi and libya. that he was so close to berlusconi that struck me aspect . >> no there'
onboard the ship. bound for libyan air space. as of tuesday, the u.s. says a total of 108 strikes have been launched on libyan targets and more than 160 missiles fired. >>> the strikes are all part of a u.n.-backed effort to stop colonel gadhafi's forces from attacking civilians, but libya's leader is defiant. he's urging his people to resist what he calls fascist aggression. here he is vowing to fight on to victory. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. we -- they will not terrorize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. >> the uprising in libya started in the eastern city of benghazi and spread across large parts of the country. the government's forces took back a lot of ground, but benghazi is in the hands of the opposition still. reza sayah is there now and joins us. give us an idea of the situation today there. >> quite a different story in benghazi than what we're hearing over the past 24 hours in tripoli. relatively calm, quiet, and peaceful. and i think that's the case for the eastern front of this w
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
. thank you very much. >>> now to libya and another day of furious fighting. u.s. navy officials say coalition forces are attacking pro gadhafi troops who have tried to storm populated areas. libyan artillery, mechanized forces and mobile missile sites as well as ammunition supplies are also being targeted. the british say the libyan air force has been destroyed and coalition forces are now flying over the country with impunity. but reports are mixed about the rebels' ability to repel gadhafi's forces in misrata and elsewhere. nbc's jim ma say da joins us live now from tripoli. jim, is this a clear sign the coalition really is stepping up the intensity of their campaign? >> hi, martin. yes, it is a clear sign, and they're stepping up their campaign because they can step up their campaign now. they spent the first four, four and a half days of this operation taking out everything that would prevent them, prevent the airplanes, the nato planes from doing this very thing. they believe that the libyan air defenses as you suggested in your lead now are just about out of commission, which
the libyan air force and no longer exists as a fighting force. the senior u.s. commander says that troops loyal to gaddafi are still violating a u.n. resolution 1973. misrata is besieged by government tanks and artillery. mike will reject reports. >> characteristically the finance -- define it, colonel gaddafi on the first night of bombing. he said that those attacking libya would end up in the dustbin of history. colonel gaddafi has pledged there would be no surrender, and this on another night with a burst of anti-aircraft fire. from the american secretary of state hillary clinton, a suggestion that efforts might be under way to look for an exit strategy. >> i am not aware that he personally has reached out, but i know people allegedly on his behalf up and reaching out. that is why i say this is a very dynamic situation. >> be diplomatic strategy has been to convince the libyan leader to take another course. these pictures provide more insight into the military reality confronting him and his forces. it shows as helicopters taking off for an operation at night with american ships involv
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
six reactors have been reconnected. also, the fallout, the u.s. fda slapping a ban on importing produce and dairy products from any of the four prefectures nearest the reactors. and workers at the crippled nuclear plant are speaking out. >>> late new reports of coalition air strikes in the overnight hours near misurata. we're just getting this information in. details in a moment. also, secretary of state hillary clinton, moammar gadhafi, both speaking out tonight. what he's saying marches to the beat of a drummer only he seems to hear. what she's saying, if true, is a potential game changer. here she is on abc news. >> are you indicating somebody close to him reaching out saying how does he get out? >> this is what we hear from so many sources. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it i'll be very -- this is my personal opinion, some of it is theater. a lot is just the way he behaves is somewhat unpredictable. but some of it is exploring, what are my options? where could i do? and we would encourage that. >> in tripoli, a surprise speech from gadhafi aired just
from the u.s. military, we rule the airwaves, we have accomplished our military objective in terms of creating a no-fly zone but don't seem yet, and certainly it's only four days in, to be cracking gadhafi's will to fight back. and if the objective is to have him leave office, are we getting closer to that? >> i think our military objective so far have been much more limited. and in that sense, the narrow sense, they've succeeded masterfully. we have suppressed his anti-aircraft capacity. we've now captured the skies over libya. and we've beaten him back so that he's not been able to get into benghazi. those are the goals, we've succeeded. we have an extraordinary trained military, the best trained in all of history. we're up against a force of like 10,000 who have decrepit equipment. it's not surprising we would succeed. the hard part is still ahead, isn't it? we see no signs, as nic robertson suggested, we see no signs that there's a crack in the circle around him. that there's going to be an overthrow, a coup from within. that it appears he's going to fight on. and now we're beg
what's happening on the ground, as you see the interviews with general hamm, the u.s. commander, africa commander, talk about this, clearly he's in charge right now. and presumably and everybody says will hand that off to a coalition, to nato, to be in charge at some point. secretary gates reiterated that again today. but in the meantime, it's -- its t -- it seems to be an awkward situation for the military. on the other hand, no-fly zones, that's something we've done before. again, that's the tactic. that's not the end game. that's not the strategy. and that has jet to be revealed, i think. >> finally, general myers, if you were running the armed forces in this operation, what would be the one thing you would want clarity on from president obama? >> well, i think any person in the military, certainly anybody in the modern military in the last couple of decades at the strategic level worries about mission creep, having an undefined mission and allowing it to creep. i understand that prettyem with, having been -- pretty well, having been around in iraq and afghanistan. admiral mullen i'm
called the u.s. memory championship which involves memorizing all sorts of crazy stuff and ended up winning which really wasn't supposed to happen. >> so you put this training to use as you say winning this competition, so what were the things that they asked you to memori memorize? what were the crazy things? >> there are several events in one of these contests, one of them is memorizing a poem, one is memorizing a whole bunch of random numbers, one of my favorite events, five strangers get up on strange and essentially reel off all of this biographical information, their names, phone numbers, the names of their pets, what kind of food they like and you've got to recall as much of that as possible. >> what are the techniques that you studied? what are the tricks you were able to use to expand the use of your brain and your memory? >> it turns out there is a whole host of techniques invented 2,500 years ago in sane shent greece, same medieval scholars used to memorize entirely books which have been kind of forgotten about except they are used by the "mental athletes" to compete in t
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)